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Granite Belt flora

On this page you will find some management techniques that will enable you to manage habitats containing endangered species.

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What makes the Granite Belt flora so special?

On the Stanthorpe Plateau, spectacular wildflower displays emerge among granite rocks, in woodland areas or along riparian water courses in spring.  The Granite Belt alone has over 900 different flowering plant species, with close to 40 listed under the Nature Conservation Act and the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act as threatened, including five listed as critically endangered.  Many are endemic to the area, meaning they are confined to a certain location or region and do not occur naturally anywhere else. 

Granite Belt flora is a term used to describe those native plants found on the Stanthorpe Plateau – an area bounded by the Queensland-New South Wales border to the east and south, Dalveen to the north, and the line that marks the transition to traprock country to the west. This area includes Girraween National Park and both Broadwater and Passchendaele State Forests.

The Granite Belt region of southern Queensland has a high degree of habitat diversity due to its elevation, topographic variation, outcropping rock and a pronounced east-west rainfall gradient. Vegetation includes tall open forest and woodland on rocky slopes, grassy open forests and woodlands on the deeper soils of lower slopes and alluvial plains and shrub lands on rock pavements. 45% remains as remnant vegetation and 12% (17 000 ha) is contained within conservation reserves including Girraween and Sundown National Parks.

Because of its location, the flora that exist on the Granite Belt comprises many species that are at their northern or southern population limits, as well as many species that can be found in our neighbouring districts e.g. traprock, New England tableland, escarpment, etc.  

Identification

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Select the logo to be taken to the Census of the Queensland Flora and Fungi 2022

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Select the logo to learn all about the Queensland Herbarium

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Select the image to learn all about collecting and identifying your own plant specimens

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Management

Managing fire

Fire

Select the image to download a powerpoint presentation from QMDC about planning a burn.

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Select the image to be taken to the Fire management page on the Qld Govt Parks and Forests webpage.

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Qld fire and biodiversity consortium log
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Select the image to be taken to the Queensland Fire and Biodiversity Consortium's Living with fire: An introduction to fire ecology resource.

Select the image to be taken to the Queensland Fire and Biodiversity Consortium webpage

Select the image to be taken to the Burning guidelines for the New England bioregion.

Managing weeds

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Control of small hand-pullable plants

Control of Weeds with Underground Reprod
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Control of vines and scramblers

Control of Weeds with Underground Reprod

Control of weeds with underground reproductive structures - 2 pages

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Control of woody weeds - 2 pages

Top 10 Weeds and information - Simcocks_

Top 10 weeds of the Granite Belt and their control - 5 pages

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Select the image to be taken to the Weeds of Southern Queensland order form

Legislation

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Select the image to be taken to the Nature Conservation Act 1992

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Select the image to be taken to the Queensland Government's Protected Plants webpage

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Select the image to read our recent submission to the independent review of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 submitted in April 2020. 

Author: Carol Booth 

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